Pandemic Hydroponics

I translated this as a way to fuel my own curiosity regarding alternative agriculture, this article is especially relevant since so many of us are home almost 24/7. For the original post, check out my friend Martín’s website, Hidroponía Casera, here!

To give some context, I’m writing this during the Coronavirus Pandemic of 2020 (Wikipedia), just in case you’re from the future and wondering why I’m writing about this. We’re going to talk about hydroponics and other crops during a pandemic.

This situation effects all of us, in every part of the world, though in different ways.

Something we do have in common is that we’re focusing on the most basic aspects (that we sometimes take for granted) of our daily lives. Transportation, work/education, health… but here we’re going to talk about food. We’re also going to focus on the most basic levels of eating, be it out of worry or real necessity… The most-sold items at supermarkets these days are basic products like flour or rice, and yeast (are a bunch of people baking or making bread or something?), etc.

It’s normal to worry and, depending on how serious your worries are, the situation could motivate you to cultivate (at least in part) your own food. “If the situation were bad… could I grow my own food at home?”

The plants in the photo at the top of the post was planted by Henrique, a friend of mine who has been following the development of the pandemic, and he loves to experiment with hydroponics, aquaponics, and anthroponics (I’ll make another post about this one), and other systems.

He’s recorded a video explaining his view on the situation and how to grow plants during it, or another situation like it.

Here’s the video, even if you aren’t thinking about growing right now, I’m sure you’ll find it interesting.

If you’d like to download the PDF with the slides, you can do so here.

You can also take a look at one of my favorite systems, one of the simplest to make, using a plastic bucket.